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How to Protect the Environment When Scuba Diving

How to Protect the Environment When Scuba Diving

Scuba is a way to explore the underwater environment, but you don't want to destroy it in the process. Employ gentle techniques to observe - rather than adversely affect - the underwater world. Enter the water carefully, avoiding objects on the shoreline and below the surface.


Steps:

Scuba is a way to explore the underwater environment, but you don't want to destroy it in the process. Employ gentle techniques to observe - rather than adversely affect - the underwater world. Enter the water carefully, avoiding objects on the shoreline and below the surface.

Steps:

  1. Enter the water carefully, avoiding objects on the shoreline and below the surface.
  2. Control your descent to keep from colliding with life-covered reefs and to limit stirring bottom composition.
  3. Mind the scuba tank and turn sideways to swim or peer beneath ledges ' otherwise this temporary hunchback will bash into objects above.
  4. Remember that fins can kick objects and create turbid clouds if you swim too close to the bottom.
  5. Know that touching (or worse, breaking) coral can severely nad permanently damage it - even if you can't see any damage.
  6. Avoid feeding or taunting marine life.
  7. Don't spearfish. Or, if you really want to, at least spearfish in shark-infested waters. You know, to even the odds a bit.

Most divers have an emotional investment in protecting reefs and aquatic life because they have experienced the thrill of diving first-hand. A scuba diver is unlikely to throw a plastic bag in the ocean because a gentle turtle may mistake it for a jellyfish dinner and die. Few divers will eat unsustainable harvested seafood because they have seen the decline in aquatic diversity with their eyes. Divers also help to protect the Earth's oceans and lakes by spending money on diving. The profitability of scuba diving as tourist industry has lead to the creation of marine parks by governments who wish to keep their dive sites healthy to attract tourists.

Tips:
Consider neutral buoyancy your most valuable technique.

Warnings:
The world's ecology of coral reefs is in peril from human impact. Treat reefs with extreme care and respect.

Overall Warnings:
Scuba diving is an inherently dangerous activity that can result in serious injury or death. We recommend that you seek proper training and equipment before attempting this activity.

Some More Instructions:

Enter the water carefully, avoiding objects on the shoreline and below the surface. Control your descent to keep from colliding with life-covered reefs and to limit stirring bottom composition. Mind the scuba tank and turn sideways to swim or peer beneath ledges ' otherwise this temporary hunchback will bash into objects above. Remember that fins can kick objects and create turbid clouds if you swim too close to the bottom. Know that touching (or worse, breaking) coral can severely nad permanently damage it - even if you can't see any damage. Avoid feeding or taunting marine life. Don't spearfish. Or, if you really want to, at least spearfish in shark-infested waters. You know, to even the odds a bit. Don't touch, handle, feed or ride on aquatic life. These actions may stress the animal, interrupt natural behaviors or provoke aggressive behaviors in a normally non aggressive species. Check out Project AWARE’s website for Ten Ways a Diver Can Protect the Underwater Environment for essential tips like these.

Egypt Based Diving Environment Protection Agencies:
National Parks of Egypt: http://www.eeaa.gov.eg/protectorates/
Red Sea Rangers: http://www.redseaparks.net/
SSDM (South Sinai Association for Diving & Marine Activities): http://southsinai.org/
Red Sea Environment Conservation/Hurghada Environmental Protection and Conservation Association(HEPCA): http://www.hepca.com/
Reef Check - A Non-Profit Organization Dedicated to Empowering People to Save Our Reefs and Oceans: http://reefcheck.org/
Egyptian Environmental Affairs Agency (EEAA)/Ministry of State For Environmental Affairs: http://www.eeaa.gov.eg/
RSEC - Red Sea Environmental Centre: http://www.redsea-ec.org/
Red Sea Chamber of Diving and Water sports: http://www.cdws.travel/
SUBEX - organizing and guiding diving safaris and protecting the environment and helping to look after marine flora and fauna: http://www.subex.org/

Last Updated on Monday 10th January 2011